Tuesday, 31 March 2009

Constantin Brancusi



Fish(Poisson) 1926







Sleeping muse I

"Constantin Brancusi was one of the founding figures of modern sculpture and one of the most original artists of the twentieth-century. His groundbreaking carvings introduced abstraction and primitivism into sculpture for the first time, and were as important as Picasso's paintings to the development of modern art. Brancusi's serenely simplified sculptures are widely acknowledged as icons of modernism. His choice of materials including marble and limestone, bronze and wood, and his individual expression through carving, established him as a leading avant-garde artist. He was a close friend of both Amedeo Modigliani and Marcel Duchamp, and his work has inspired sculptors from Barbara Hepworth to Carl Andre and Donald Judd."

Saturday, 28 March 2009

Heritage Record - Detail

Heritage Record - Detail

Never doubt the mummy grapevine.
I like butterflies but possibly not as much as spiders.

Wednesday, 25 March 2009

I was looking for a funny feminist

YouTube - Funny Feminist Video in HL2


I couldn't really find any...quite liked this though I think it might be the gun.

The Meaning of Cyberlife

YouTube - The Meaning of Cyberlife


That'll be the gun again....and the soundtrack.

Frieze Magazine | Comment | Open Stage

Frieze Magazine | Comment | Open Stage


I've been reading soooo (too) much about feminism recently - 1st Wave, 2nd Wave...I believe we're on 3rd Wave as postfeminism seems to be a dirty word in such circles... Anyway, I was interested to read this, then I was captivated by the horror of it. Talk about suffering for your art....

Sunday, 15 March 2009

definitely maybe



Nearly there I think






There was something a bit brash about the gold ribbon. I tried black for the death like quality, but decided the red ribbon was better. The colour reminded me of the inside of coffins (not that I've seen too many)...also funeral parlours/crematoriums often use 'maroon' carpets/curtains....I'm not sure why that matters, she was never alive...

We play with mirrors




Even more studio







I've noticed that the thing is taking on a cartoonish/muppet quality. I've thought about changing it, but I think I'll keep going and see where it goes. Actually, the ridiculousness of it might be good in the end.

I know...gross...but I can't stop staring



Some more studio work




Studio work
















I had been thinking of using wax to make something, however got quite inspired by Janine Antoni and Matthew Barney using lard/vaseline. Decided to give it a go...Not sure whether the thing will hold up, it might melt or be eaten by ?? Anyway, when I began to work with it, I realised that it has a deliciously unexpected sensual quality about it....nice. Maybe apart from the smell which is quite rancid.

Also like the fact that the material suggests domestic drudge....chuuups.

Saturday, 7 March 2009

Faith Wilding Home Site


Faith Wilding Home Site

Faith Wilding



4Waiting A 15-minute monolog, scripted and performed by Faith Wilding in the Performance program at Womanhouse, "Waiting" condenses a woman's entire life into a monotonous, repetitive cycle of waiting for life to begin while she is serving and maintaining the lives of others.




Waiting
A Poem by Faith Wilding
Waiting . . . waiting . . . waiting . . .
Waiting for someone to come in
Waiting for someone to hold me
Waiting for someone to feed me
Waiting for someone to change my diaper Waiting . . .
Waiting to scrawl, to walk, waiting to talk
Waiting to be cuddled
Waiting for someone to take me outside
Waiting for someone to play with me
Waiting for someone to take me outside
Waiting for someone to read to me, dress me, tie my shoes
Waiting for Mommy to brush my hair
Waiting for her to curl my hair
Waiting to wear my frilly dress
Waiting to be a pretty girl
Waiting to grow up Waiting . . .
Waiting for my breasts to develop
Waiting to wear a bra
Waiting to menstruate
Waiting to read forbidden books
Waiting to stop being clumsy
Waiting to have a good figure
Waiting for my first date
Waiting to have a boyfriend
Waiting to go to a party, to be asked to dance, to dance close
Waiting to be beautiful
Waiting for the secret
Waiting for life to begin Waiting . . .
Waiting to be somebody
Waiting to wear makeup
Waiting for my pimples to go away
Waiting to wear lipstick, to wear high heels and stockings
Waiting to get dressed up, to shave my legs
Waiting to be pretty Waiting . . .
Waiting for him to notice me, to call me
Waiting for him to ask me out
Waiting for him to pay attention to me
Waiting for him to fall in love with me
Waiting for him to kiss me, touch me, touch my breasts
Waiting for him to pass my house
Waiting for him to tell me I’m beautiful
Waiting for him to ask me to go steady
Waiting to neck, to make out, waiting to go all the way
Waiting to smoke, to drink, to stay out late
Waiting to be a woman Waiting . . .
Waiting for my great love
Waiting for the perfect man
Waiting for Mr. Right Waiting . . .
Waiting to get married
Waiting for my wedding day
Waiting for my wedding night
Waiting for sex
Waiting for him to make the first move
Waiting for him to excite me
Waiting for him to give me pleasure
Waiting for him to give me an orgasm Waiting . . .
Waiting for him to come home, to fill my time Waiting . . .
Waiting for my baby to come
Waiting for my belly to swell
Waiting for my breasts to fill with milk
Waiting to feel my baby move
Waiting for my legs to stop swelling
Waiting for the first contractions
Waiting for the contractions to end
Waiting for the head to emerge
Waiting for the first scream, the afterbirth
Waiting to hold my baby
Waiting for my baby to suck my milk
Waiting for my baby to stop crying
Waiting for my baby to sleep through the night
Waiting for my breasts to dry up
Waiting to get my figure back, for the stretch marks to go away
Waiting for some time to myself
Waiting to be beautiful again
Waiting for my child to go to school
Waiting for life to begin again Waiting . . .
Waiting for my children to come home from school
Waiting for them to grow up, to leave home
Waiting to be myself
Waiting for excitement
Waiting for him to tell me something interesting, to ask me how I feel
Waiting for him to stop being crabby, reach for my hand, kiss me good morning
Waiting for fulfillment
Waiting for the children to marry
Waiting for something to happen Waiting . . .
Waiting to lose weight
Waiting for the first gray hair
Waiting for menopause
Waiting to grow wise
Waiting . . .
Waiting for my body to break down, to get ugly
Waiting for my flesh to sag
Waiting for my breasts to shrivel up
Waiting for a visit from my children, for letters
Waiting for my friends to die
Waiting for my husband to die Waiting . . .
Waiting to get sick
Waiting for things to get better
Waiting for winter to end
Waiting for the mirror to tell me that I’m old
Waiting for a good bowel movement
Waiting for the pain to go away
Waiting for the struggle to end
Waiting for release
Waiting for morning
Waiting for the end of the day
Waiting for sleep Waiting . . .
“Waiting” was performed at Womanhouse in Los Angeles sponsored by the
Feminist Art Program, California Institute of the Arts

Sunday, 1 March 2009

Paddy Hartley


Dissecting Set (Hers), 2000

Kitchen, surgical and post mortem equipment, fabric
80cm x 150cm x 10cm


'Dissecting Set (Her)' is part of the 'Emancipation' series. Based around the idea that the majority of acts of violence and murder occur in the home, usually by someone the victim knows and loves.

Objects usually associated with domesticity are presented in an altogether more sinister guise. 'Dissecting Set (Her)' features a mixture of kitchen equipment, medical and post mortem equipment (bone nibblers), all of which blend into a similar aesthetic and are presented in a tool wrap made from a gingham tablecloth.

The 'Emancipation Series' was first exhibited in '7OVER5 New Contemporary Art' at Leeds Metropolitan University Gallery in 2000.

Susie MacMurray



A Mixture of Frailties, 2004

rubber gloves, calico, shop mannequin
185cm x 325cm diameter

Performance Garment Sculpture constructed from domestic household gloves turned inside out.